Omokoroa Structure Plan

Planning for the future of our peninsula paradise

In around 40 years the Omokoroa Peninsula should be fully developed and home to something like 12,000 people.

To make sure Omokoroa remains a peninsula paradise it is important that planning decisions made today are well considered to ensure that all current and future residents have a great quality of life.

 An aerial view of Omokoroa. Looking towards the State Highway from above the rail line. Omokoroa Road is to the left.  

Western Bay of Plenty District Council is starting to plan for the next phase of Omokoroa's development – the area between the railway line and State Highway 2 – through a document called the Omokoroa structure plan. Structure plans provide a long term framework for future growth and development of a particular area.

The structure plan takes into account the community wishes – as expressed through the Omokoroa Community Plan, the Long Term Plan and other planning documents. These acknowledge the growth of the village into a town and sets a pathway for actions that assure Omokoroa remains a great town to live in and visit.

It is important that people think about the Omokoroa of the future with 9000 new residents.

 The Structure Plan area being reviewed.

When looking at the structure plan we'd ask people to visualise 2060 and think about how the peninsula will change and how planned development needs to occur to make it a great place to live, learn, work and play in.

We want to know what areas people think will be suitable for housing, where a commercial area that complements new houses and other land uses will go, to think about transport links, schools and community facilities, and what types of parks and other recreation spaces will be needed – and how these can all fit together to create a great place.

This is long-term, big picture thinking. It's essential that we do this now and get it right so we put in place development rules that mean Omokoroa will continue to be a great place to live in forty years' time. It's also important to help make sure that decisions are not made in the short term that could compromise the long term vision.

The development of the structure plan will happen in four parts:

1 - Identifying what needs to be taken into account when planning for future development. Open Days for the community to share their thoughts and give feedback were held during November 2017.​

2 - Development of detailed options for the area between the railway line and State Highway. This will be based on the feedback from the open days and incorporate best planning principles. ​This is the stage we're currently at.​

3 - Discuss options with the community.

4 - Pick a preferred option and create a detailed structure plan. This will also include rules that will guide how development can occur.

Keep up to date and have your say by visiting http://haveyoursay.westernbay.govt.nz.

Frequently asked questions:

What is a structure plan?

A structure plan provides a long term framework for the future growth and development of a particular area.

It takes a long term and big picture approach to the development, or redevelopment, of an area – identifying geographic constraints, what areas are suitable for housing, what development could look like and where infrastructure needs to go. It puts the pieces of the puzzle together and ensures the area functions as a whole.

It is also becoming more widely understood that urban environments impact on our health - be that in a mental or physical way.

The accessibility and location of shops, green space, types and position of housing, types of land use (commercial, small business etc) and access to transport have a significant impact on our health.

These are all the planning elements that influence happiness and health, and make an urban area pleasant to live, learn, work and play in.

For example, communities with greater access to cycling and walking opportunities, social destinations close to home (e.g. schools, workplaces, shops and reserves) and affordable quality housing have better health and wellbeing outcomes.

Why Omokoroa?

Omokoroa has been identified as a growth settlement for a number of years, and various planning exercises and infrastructure development has occurred to provide for that growth.

In the earlier 2000s a portion of the land between the railway and State Highway (that you can see currently being earth worked) was zoned for urban purposes.

The remainder of this area of the peninsular was zoned as ‘future urban’. This effectively left that area as rural but signalled that it would become urban in the future.

Why do it?

It's important we think about and plan for the future of our towns. We need to make sure development (residential, commercial, recreational and required infrastructure) provides a great quality of life for future residents while still being in keeping with the character of our villages.

This is more important now than ever before. The plan will inform how the area between the rail line and the state highway develops over the next forty years to accommodate an additional 9000 people.

Because of this growth, it's important that development doesn't happen haphazardly, and instead is planned, considered, and creates a place that retains its character and special feel.

Why do it now?

Last year the Government legislated the National Policy Statement on Urban Development Capacity. This requires high growth areas in New Zealand to have at least 10 years' supply of serviced residential land, plus a buffer of 20 percent. Omokoroa has nine years of supply which means it does not meet that new legislation, and Council must proceed with planning the next phase of Omokoroa's development now.

How is it going to affect me? What will it mean for the community?

Omokoroa is going to grow. By 2060 the population of the peninsula is expected to be around 12,000 and fully developed.

If you're a current or future resident, live in any of the outlying areas, or just like to visit Omokoroa, this will affect you because the peninsula is changing, and is going to change more – you can already see this happening today with residential housing growth.

The structure plan looks at more than just residential housing, it also considers all other aspects of growth that make an area a great place to live, learn, work and play  – parks and reserves, business areas, commercial areas, the location of schools, community facilities and medical facilities, and infrastructure needed to service it all.

The structure plan is a way for the community to get involved and have a say about the future layout of their place when it is fully developed.

How is Council involved?

The Omokoroa structure plan will eventually be incorporated into the Western Bay of Plenty District Plan – a legal document under the Resource Management Act which provides rules for new development or changes to the use of land and buildings.

It's not all about private and commercial development, growth also means that the infrastructure (roads, water connections, parks and reserves, transport links) that supports a town or area also needs to be upgraded.

Who is involved?

A structure plan requires input from local residents, those who work in an area, iwi and other key stakeholders. This plan sets out the broad layout of appropriate land uses, key infrastructure and transport links and provides a planning framework for the future growth of Omokoroa.

What does Council want to achieve?

We want the community to think about how you would like Omokoroa to be in 2060, fully developed and with 9000 more residents living in peninsula paradise.

 This is big picture thinking. The point of this exercise is to leave a legacy of a well thought out, attractive and functional Omokoroa for future generations.

How can I be involved in the decision making process?

The structure plan preparation will take place in four parts:

  1. Identifying what needs to be taken into account when planning for future development.
  2. Development of detailed options for the area between the railway line and State Highway. This will be based on the feedback from the open days and incorporate best planning principles.

  3. Discuss options with the community.

  4. Pick a preferred option and create a detailed structure plan. This will also include rules that will guide how development can occur.

For more information find the project page on http://haveyoursay.westernbay.govt.nz.

Page reviewed: 03 Apr 2018 4:19pm